New answers tagged

4

You might want to read the paper DIFFERENT VERSIONS OF THE SAVINGS METHOD FOR THE TIME LIMITED VEHICLE ROUTING PROBLEM[1] which gives time complexities between $O(n^3)$ and $O(n^2\log(n))$ note that in these complexity analysis the number of nodes not nodes as $n$. The reason why it is $n^2$ and not $n$ is this part of the algorithm: Taken from EOR 151 – ...


3

For what it's worth, we've been gathering a bunch of Design Patterns in chapter 20 of OptaPlanner's User Guide. Here are some of the drawings: There's also a video that explains this deeper. Besides these modeling basics, there are orthogonal features to consider (document in other places in the user guide): Pinning: allow the user to lock in a shift ...


2

Having previously worked in software engineering, then trained in mathematics (stats & OR), and since worked in OR for ~3 years, I have a strong opinion on this. If you want to work in OR then it is expected that you are familiar with the topics in the book including some theory behind LP, MIP, and so on. In practice, the real difficulty in tackling a ...


2

Hillier and Lieberman is a good read and solid reference to get the "big picture" of many techniques. You may also want to look into Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms by Winston.


9

For an idea of industrial applications of OR write large (minus the gory technical details), you might want to look at a few INFORMS publications. Analytics (aimed at the general public) and OR/MS Today (for INFORMS membership) contain articles about implementations. The INFORMS Journal of Applied Analytics (formerly known as Interfaces) contains primarily ...


9

You can consider going through below blogs: i) Erwin Kalvelagen's blog ii) Prof Paul Rubin's blog (https://orinanobworld.blogspot.com/) Interesting things about above blogs is that you can see different applications, their implementations and practical issues while handling them. Another good course is by Prof. Pascal Van on Coursera (https://www.coursera....


6

I found it quite useful to start (social scientist with background in stats). I had mostly read more complicated papers using linear programming in geographical allocation contexts, and was totally baffled by it. (Relative to stats, in retrospect people using X/Y as decision variables and Greek letters as fixed values is where quite a bit of my confusion ...


2

Dynamic Programming is often a good method of choice for solving this class of problems. Chapter 3 of The Art and Theory of Dynamic Programming refers to this class of problems as Resource Allocation problems. There is one constraint restricting the amount of available resource, the parameter $B$, with a linear or nonlinear objective function. An interesting ...


Top 50 recent answers are included