17

Just apply for any job you find interesting and you think you can do well. The trick lies in convincing the people hiring that you are great value for money. Although this might seem obvious, my advice would be to also consider adjusting your salary expectations according to your industrial experience. Because asking for too much money is the greatest ...


11

Excel remains extensively used in industry for non-OR applications. That means that if you are doing an OR application that does not require access to a database, there's a good chance the data for the application will come to you in either an XLSX or CSV file. On the flip side, when it comes time to convey the solution provided by your application, it is ...


9

MATLAB is a language built on top of a library. Python (with NumPy & numba) is a language with a library built under it. Neither is ideal. Like all languages, both have a few quirks, due to their history. My suggestion: Door Number 3, Julia. In either case (MATLAB, Python, Julia), you should ask yourself: Is your immediate goal to master the math, or to ...


9

For an idea of industrial applications of OR write large (minus the gory technical details), you might want to look at a few INFORMS publications. Analytics (aimed at the general public) and OR/MS Today (for INFORMS membership) contain articles about implementations. The INFORMS Journal of Applied Analytics (formerly known as Interfaces) contains primarily ...


9

You can consider going through below blogs: i) Erwin Kalvelagen's blog ii) Prof Paul Rubin's blog (https://orinanobworld.blogspot.com/) Interesting things about above blogs is that you can see different applications, their implementations and practical issues while handling them. Another good course is by Prof. Pascal Van on Coursera (https://www.coursera....


8

This answers is based on experience from computer science in Germany. Different fields and cultures might differ. However, I think that the core message of my answer is still somewhat applicable in any field, hence I've decided to post it. They may be asking for "industry experience", but as virtually always with job postings, feel free to convince ...


7

I was on the job market a very long time ago, so this information may be past its use-by date. When I interviewed at an industrial lab, I was told that they treated a successfully completed PhD as the equivalent of $x$ years of experience. I've forgotten the value they gave me for $x$, but I think $x\approx 3$ for them (and would likely vary somewhat for ...


6

I found it quite useful to start (social scientist with background in stats). I had mostly read more complicated papers using linear programming in geographical allocation contexts, and was totally baffled by it. (Relative to stats, in retrospect people using X/Y as decision variables and Greek letters as fixed values is where quite a bit of my confusion ...


6

I am geophysics professor and have been solving scientific computing problems in Matlab since 2000. In the last ~8 years graduate students have been preferring to work in Python. I have the following observations: On a practical level Python is MUCH slower than Matlab. Code that my graduate students write is literally orders of magnitude slower than my ...


5

One of my favorite things about working in operations research is diving into a new problem to understand all the complexities. Getting a non-OR person to list all the requirements for an optimization problem is almost like asking someone to explain all the steps to ride a bike. They know how to do it, but won't be able to explain all the steps. Here are ...


5

Many many people know Excel and use Excel. So many OR projects start with some Excel spreadsheet. And that is why being able to read from and write to Excel is key. You may even start the project with the Excel solver. Moreover Excel is a common tool when companies choose plugin optimization instead of packages, custom or tailored optimization.


4

I recently got a job as a junior software developer, coming from a biology post-doc. I think what got me the job were my personal programming projects, that clearly showed I was interested, and had some level of aptitude and ability - at least enough to be trainable in a reasonable time frame. Regardless of the exact switch, try looking at yourself as a ...


4

It depends of course on what kind of job you are looking for, but the reason for companies looking for experience is just because then want to see a kind of track record. When we look for new people in our team (machine learning developers or (research) data scientists) we are mostly interested in project samples. Besides the appropriate knowledge you've ...


4

The main reason why Pyomo is being used in industry and JuMP is not is that JuMP is a version 0.21.6 package whereas Pyomo is v5.7.3. Naturally, most businesses are not going to use a package with version less than 1. Also, according to the following discussion, first-class nonlinear optimization support is something for v2.0 (two or three years away): https:...


3

The latest JuMP.jl website gives a few examples of its use in industry: route school buses by the Boston school district plan powergrid expansion by PSR optimize milk output by dairy farmers in New Zealand I personally find JuMP.jl, by far, the most user-friendly and flexible optimization interface I ever used. By far.


3

For new comers from IT / Computer and Engineering fields, their first job / internship depends upon their final year project / research thesis. So write the details of your final project on the first page of your CV especially the tools and technologies used in it. Submit it to different technology companies. You'll surely be called for few interviews even ...


2

Having previously worked in software engineering, then trained in mathematics (stats & OR), and since worked in OR for ~3 years, I have a strong opinion on this. If you want to work in OR then it is expected that you are familiar with the topics in the book including some theory behind LP, MIP, and so on. In practice, the real difficulty in tackling a ...


2

Hillier and Lieberman is a good read and solid reference to get the "big picture" of many techniques. You may also want to look into Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms by Winston.


2

I'd go with Python because Python is a general purpose programming language and is much more widely used in industry than MATLAB. In the industry you rarely find yourself just code optimization algorithms or models in your daily work. It is more like you write an entire pipeline from data acquisition, data cleaning, model development (both statistical ...


2

I am surprised that no one has mentioned the classic Applied Mathematical Programming by Bradley, Hax, and Magnanti (Addison-Wesley, 1977). This book was one of the reference books in a few courses when I was an undergrad. It includes many examples and quite a few real world cases solved by mathematical programming. I read a few chapters of the book back ...


2

For specific applications in industry, refer to this website: https://neos-guide.org/Case-Studies


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